Five teams have been selected to workshop their short film project over three days for the final stage of Paerangi Project. In March 2022 the teams will attend the Stage Threeworkshop, a three-day residential development workshop where they will receive tailored script feedback, directing mentoring, and producing advice from industry mentors. The workshop teaches the participants valuable skills to push their projects closer to production and is also an opportunity for them to meet like-minded people and industry practitioners.

In June 2021, 110 aspiring filmmakers from around the motu registered for Stage One of Paerangi Project to pursue their interest in developing a short film or web series. From this group, seven teams were selected to participate in Stage Two, and received six weeks of online mentorship with an experienced filmmaker to refine their project.

The projects and participants chosen for Stage Three are:

Congratulations to all the participants!

The Paerangi Project was initiated to support those who live outside the main centres, in remote regions or those who are isolated from opportunities to learn about filmmaking. Registrations came from all over NZ; Auckland / Tāmaki Makaurau, Bay of Plenty / Te Moana-a-Toi, Canterbury / Waitaha, Gisborne/ Te Tai Rāwhiti, Hawke’s Bay / Te Matau-a-Māui, Manawatū-Wanganui, Northland / Te Tai Tokerau, Otago / Ōtākou, Southland / Murihiku, Tasman / Te Tai-o-Aorere, Waikato, and Wellington / Te Whanga-nui-a-Tara, as well as from the Cook Islands, Fiji and Vanuatu.

This initiative came about thanks to the Screenrights Cultural Fund  New Voices, to advance those who, for whatever reason, have found doors not readily open to them. New Zealand Film Commission matched the funding to support the development of aspiring filmmakers who have felt isolated from opportunities.

              

Learn how to make your feature film script stand out in this in-depth scriptwriting workshop. David White will lead you through some of the things he discovered when writing and directing This Town.

Openings! Whether on the page or on screen, the opening scene needs to grab the audience. During the first half of the workshop, David will explore ways to write an impactful opening scene by sharing his experience with the scripted opening of This Town, and the vast changes made to translate the script to the screen.

Write what you know! From locations to characters, using richness from the world around you can help create depth especially when working with the lower budgets of first films. In the second half of this workshop, David will explore how using texture from places and characters you know intimately can help you build a believable world for your film.


Saturday 7th August 2021
9am – 5pm
Drama 2, Te Whaea National Dance & Drama Centre, 11 Hutchison Road, Newton, Wellington.

Who it is for: This workshop is aimed at beginning and emerging feature film writers. Directors and producers wanting to learn more about taking a script into production will also find this workshop valuable and are encouraged to attend. All levels of experience welcome.

Cost: General Admission $23 (incl. GST) via Eventbrite.

What to Bring: Pen and paper. Snacks, tea and coffee will be provided. Please bring your own lunch or there are places to buy your lunch in the vicinity.

COVID Alert Level Note: This workshop will go ahead under Alert Level 1. If Wellington is in Alert Level 2, the workshop date will be reviewed. If Wellington is in Alert Level 3 or 4, the workshop will be postponed.


ABOUT DAVID WHITE

David White has produced and directed a substantial body of documentary and drama work that has enjoyed considerable national and international success, among them Meat, Shihad: Beautiful Machine, I Kill, Little Criminals, The Cleanest Pig and This Town.  His work has screened at over 50 film festivals including Sundance, AFI, SXSW, SilverDocs, Tribeca, MIFF, TRUE/FALSE, Clermont Ferrand and been commissioned and screened on BBC, Sky and PRIME TV.

He was the first New Zealander to be shortlisted for a Cinema Eye Honor for his film I Kill (2013). His next two documentaries Little Criminals (2015) and Of Decades in Colour (2017) aired on PRIME TV to strong ratings and critical acclaim. Feature documentary Meat (2017) opened to 4-star reviews and sell-out audiences throughout NZ, was released on multiple NZME platforms and has sold globally.

David’s (writer/director/producer) debut comedy film This Town was developed at the prestigious Venice Biennale College – Cinema, amongst just 12 selected from a worldwide call. It was critically acclaimed and stayed at number one at the NZ theatrical box office for 21days. World sales are being handled by The Film Sales Company.


This workshop is made possible thanks to generous support from New Zealand Film Commission and Creative Communities Wellington.

 

“Nōku te whiwhi ki te mahi i runga i tēnei kaupapa whakamīharo. FilmUp was a game-changer for me and my career – the intensives allowed me to work with incredible mentors, peers and form relationships which lead to me directing on a prime-time drama and developing my feature film. I highly recommend this amazing opportunity!”

– Cian Elyse White,
FilmUp 2020 participant (mentor Louise Gough)

“FilmUp is brilliant! It’s the knowledge that someone has your back, and you aren’t doing this filmmaking thing alone. That support is invaluable especially at the beginning of a project when filmmaking often feels very solo.”

Vanessa Wells,
FilmUp 2020 participant (Mentor Justin Pemberton)


Want to build momentum in your career and push yourself to your full potential?

The FilmUp Mentorship programme returns for its ninth year to support and empower up to eight tenacious and talented filmmakers to reach the next stage in their creative careers. If you are developing a feature film or documentary this programme could be just what you need to progress your work to the next stage.

A mentor for each filmmaker forms the cornerstone of the programme, along with six FilmUp Hub days when the participants come together for group work.

Applicants must have a feature project in development, and be able to demonstrate that their project and career are at the right stage for mentorship and wrap-around support.

Successful applicants will take part in 20 hours of mentorship with an experienced film practitioner over an eight-month period and six FilmUp hubs spread between August 2021 and February 2022. These hubs are tailored to meet the needs of the selected filmmakers and include workshops, peer discussions and round tables with industry leaders.

Participants are the driving force of a successful mentorship as they take hold of their own learning and development. This autonomy is fostered from the start of the programme when participants are actively involved in the selection of their mentor. Throughout the programme there is wrap-around support from Script to Screen.

Since its inception in 2013, FilmUp has gone from strength to strength, with a growing alumni of talented local filmmakers who have benefitted from the programme including Briar March (The Coffin Club, There Once Was An Island: Te Henua A Nnoho)Chelsea Winstanley (Jojo Rabbit, MERATA: How Mum Decolonised the Screen, What We Do in the Shadows)Florian Habicht (James & Isey, Spookers, Love Story)Gaysorn Thavat (The Justice of Bunny King)Jake Mahaffy (Free in Deed)Nic Gorman (Human Traces)Sophie Henderson (Baby Done, Fantail) and Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa (Take Home Pay, Three Wise Cousins). You can read about other participants and an impressive list of mentors who have helped these filmmakers take a step up in their careers here.

To apply you need to be working on a feature film or documentary. Here’s what’s required for the application:

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: Tues 18 May, 11:59pm

Make sure you read our Top Tips to make your FilmUp application shine while crafting your application.


FilmUp is made possible thanks to financial support from the New Zealand Film Commission

The South Shorts Mentorship programme returns in 2021 with ten emerging filmmakers selected to take part. Under the leadership and guidance of renowned screenwriter and director Briar Grace-Smith (Cousins, The Strength of Water), participants will develop their short film projects through a script-focused mentorship.

Now in its sixth year, the programme guides emerging South Auckland affiliated talent to develop their short film scripts. Over a sixth-month period, the participants get individual script notes from Briar Grace-Smith, meet for workshops where they do group script read-throughs, and hear from guest filmmakers about their experience making short films.

“Since its inception in 2015, South Shorts has seen numerous alumni gone on to make films. The programme provides a safe space for aspiring and emerging South Auckland filmmakers to gain confidence in themselves as writers while building a sense of community within the industry,” says Eloise Veber, Script to Screen Programme Manager. “Ultimately we want to see more stories from South Auckland filmmakers produced and seen by audiences. We feel so privileged to continue to do this work thanks to support from our funders.”

The search for South Shorts Mentorship participants begins with our annual two-day South Auckland Short Film Workshop held each year in October.

Congratulations to the filmmakers selected for South Shorts 2021:

 

The South Shorts Mentorship Programme is made possible thanks to generous support from Foundation North with additional support from the New Zealand Film Commission.

               

Script to Screen is excited to bring you an online TALK with the very talented Laurence Andries, a writer, producer and director of US scripted drama.

Laurence has written, produced and directed over 12 US drama series in the past 20 years. Most recently he was co-executive producer of Shonda Rhimes’ How To Get Away With Murder and currently is a writer and co-executive producer of Blue Bloods. He has worked on an eclectic mix of drama television including Six Feet UnderAlias and HBO’s The Pacific.

Alongside his series drama work, Laurence is the vice president of programming at the Writers Guild Foundation, a US non-profit that preserves and promotes the history and craft of writing for the screen.

In this Script to Screen TALK, Laurence will discuss working on series drama in the US right now with moderator Fiona Samuel. This discussion will include the role of the US showrunner, why writers need to think like a producer and why this TALK is entitled “There has to be a pony in here somewhere!“.

Laurence is an advisor for Series Bootcamp, our series development programme which will take place this November. He will do online advisory sessions with four of the seven selected teams.


Wed 11 Nov
1:00pm – 2:00pm NZDT – TALK
Live on Zoom Webinar

You need to register for the TALK in advance to receive the link to join. You are also welcome to submit questions ahead of time to help guide the discussion.

The TALK will be available to view on Script to Screen YouTube and Facebook pages afterwards.


This Script to Screen TALK is made possible thanks to generous support from the New Zealand Film Commission, the US Embassy, the US Arts Envoy and Foundation North.

      

Script to Screen is delighted to announce the projects and teams selected to take part in Series Bootcamp 2020, a programme created to nurture emerging and mid-career writers and producers as they develop their series concepts.

The teams will workshop their series concepts over two stages. At stage one, each team will have an online session with an advisor from the U.S. The two advisors, Laurence Andries (VP of Programming at the Writer’s Guild Foundation, How to Get Away with Murder, Blue Bloods, Six Feet Under) and Jill Goldsmith (Boston Legal, Law & Order, Rizzoli & Isles), will give feedback on how to further develop the concept to appeal to an international audience. The teams will bring that feedback to stage two and attend a two-day intensive workshop to continue to develop their concepts with exceptional local story and producer advisors. Some participants are experienced in other formats so the workshop will also cover the nuances of writing and producing series for the screen.

For this first Series Bootcamp, Script to Screen received 61 applications. Three external selectors went through a robust process compiling a shortlist of 15 and ultimately selected seven projects to be developed. They said “there was so much evident talent – freshness, originality & skill. We wished there were more places to offer. To have made the shortlist was a real mark of quality, and the selection was passionately argued. Our congratulations to all the chosen teams – the future is bright!”

Script to Screen thanks all the filmmakers who applied.

Congratulations to the teams whose series concepts will be developed at Series Bootcamp 2020:

 

Series Bootcamp is made possible thanks to generous support from the New Zealand Film Commission, US Embassy and the US Arts Envoy.

      

Calling all aspiring filmmakers, storytellers and creatives! Want to learn how to use the power of cinema to tell your stories?

 

The 2020 South Auckland Short Film Workshop is a two-day workshop to learn the art of making short films. Whether you’re new to filmmaking or have some experience, we are calling everyone who aspires to tell their stories on screen to come and learn what it takes to bring your film to life.

This workshop is intended for people who either live in South Auckland or have a connection with the area.

Over one weekend you will be guided by experienced filmmakers about the principles of how to write a short film, the role of the director, what it takes to get your short film off the ground, and pitching to funders and collaborators. Speakers include Marina McCartney (Milk & Honey, Vai), Todd Karehana (Ahikāroa, My Brother Mitchell) and Nikki Si’ulepa (Same But Different, Mā, Snow in Paradise)

Who it is for: New and emerging creatives from any industry or background with a connection to the South Auckland community who have an interest in short filmmaking.

When: Saturday 31 Oct – Sunday 1 Nov 2020, 9am – 5pm each day

Where: Te Haa o Manukau – Ground Floor, 2 Osterley Way, Manukau.
$5 all-day parking is available at 50 Manukau Station Road – an Auckland Transport carpark next to the bus station which is a short walk to the venue.

Cost: General Admission $5.75 (incl GST). Tickets via Eventbrite.

What to Bring: Pen and paper. Morning and afternoon tea will be provided. Please bring lunch with you or there are plenty of cafes in the area to buy lunch and there is space available to eat your lunch if you bring it with you.

Participants from this workshop will be eligible to apply for Script to Screen’s South Shorts 2021 Mentorship Programme. Read more about South Shorts 2021.

Image: Money Honey written and directed by Isaac Knights-Washbourn. Winner of NZIFF Ngā Whanaunga Māori Pasifika Shorts Best Film Award and Show Me Shorts 2020 Best Director Award.

BUY TICKETS


ABOUT OUR SPEAKERS

 

MARINA MCCARTNEY
Marina was born and raised in Manukau City, New Zealand. From a Geordie Father, Samoan Mother and Cook Islands step-Mother, she is interested in how cultural heritage effects the way we are viewed and how we view others. She holds an MA in Screen Production (First Class Honours) and is an award-winning filmmaker and academic. Her areas of expertise are Pacific Studies, Pacific filmmaking, Pacific representation on screen and of the Pacific woman. She is a PhD candidate and Vice Chancellor’s Doctoral Scholar exploring Pacific filmmaking and is developing a range of projects including her next feature film, The Return.

TODD KAREHANA
Todd Karehana (Ngai Te Rangi, Ngāti Awa, Ngati Ruapani) is an experimental storyteller with a passion for creating new images of minorities. He has five years’ experience in the New Zealand film and television industry with companies such as Kura Productions, Pango Productions, and Piki Films. Alumni of the Masters in Screen Production programme at The University of Auckland, Karehana was the writer and director on several short films such as The Kweenz of Kelston, and My Brother Mitchell – which screened at numerous international film festivals. His recent credits include; storyliner, writer, script editor and Social Media Manager on drama series Ahikāroa, storyliner and writer on children’s animated series The Exceptional Squad, Social Media Manager on animated series Aroha Bridge, and, writing support on feature film Ngā Pouwhenua.

NIKKI SI’ULEPA
Nikki Si’ulepa is an award winning actor, writer, director and camera operator of Samoan heritage from the villages of Sātalo and Solaūa. Nikki’s short films have screened at international film festivals including Berlinale, Tribeca, Sydney, NZIFF, and imagineNATIVE. Her debut NZFC funded short film, Snow in Paradise was shot entirely on location in Aitutaki, Cook Islands and was selected for the Berlinale in 2011 and again for the NATIVe program in 2019. Nikki was one of 250 participants and the only Kiwi/Pacific Islander selected from over 7,000 applicants for the Berlinale Talents program in 2017. Nikki’s self funded her next short film, Ma, and Aroha was one of ten short films in the K’Rd Stories collection. Nikki next short, Counting Cars (post production), was an experiment to test her working relationship with her wife, Rachel Aneta Wills, in anticipation of their romantic comedy feature film Same But Different: A True NZ Love Story. Nikki is currently in post production with short film, This is Your Half Hour Call and is developing a television series and two feature films. Nikki likes vegan Magnum ice-cream.


WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

Saturday 31st October

Sunday 1st November



We’ve been busy zooming, emailing and texting as a team every day, creating a future for Script to Screen that can respond to and embrace change; and exploring new ways to connect our community and support our alumni’s wellbeing during these extraordinary times and we’re pleased to be launching our initiative, Awhi: Peer to Peer Conversations.

Script to Screen is establishing Awhi for alumni to draw on each other when a situation calls for an impartial phone conversation. It can give them a sounding board for an issue to be talked through, an idea tested, a problem solved or to simply have someone to call on that might have been in the same position as you.

Awhi is a safe space available to our whānau of filmmakers where they can be open and honest, get guidance in their careers, suggestions to progress their work and encouragement from someone who understands what it’s like in our film industry. Everyone who signs up to Awhi can be the maker and/or receiver of a call. This is the beginning of a community that supports each other through conversation – even if they have never met.

If you are an Alumni of one of our programmes we invite you to register here.

REGISTER FOR AWHI 


If you feel like your mental health is in crisis or are worried about the mental health of someone you know, please visit the Mental Health Foundation website for a list of some of the services available in New Zealand that offer support, information and help. All services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week unless otherwise specified.

National helplines

Need to talk? Free call or text 1737 any time for support from a trained counsellor

Lifeline – 0800 543 354 (0800 LIFELINE) or free text 4357 (HELP)

Suicide Crisis Helpline – 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)

Healthline – 0800 611 116

Samaritans – 0800 726 666

In April 2020, Script to Screen established Awhi for alumni to draw on each other when a situation calls for an impartial phone conversation. It can give them a sounding board for an issue to be talked through, an idea tested, a problem solved or to simply have someone to call on that might have been in the same position as you.

Awhi is a safe space available to our whānau of filmmakers where they can be open and honest, get guidance in their careers, suggestions to progress their work and encouragement from someone who understands what it’s like in our film industry. Everyone who signs up to Awhi can be the maker and/or receiver of a call. This is the beginning of a community that supports each other through conversation – even if they have never met.

If you are an Alumni of one of our programmes we invite you to register.

REGISTER FOR AWHI 


How Awhi works:

Script to Screen will connect alumni for one-on-one video or phone conversations. Each person can use Awhi to be connected to a peer up to twice a year, and we suggest keeping the conversation to no longer than 60 mins.

When you want to make an Awhi call, fill out our Awhi Conversation Request Form so we can match you with the best person from the Awhi community.  

Once we receive your submitted form, we will work to find a match and then connect you both via email. If you requested the call, then it is up to you to email the filmmaker we have connected you with to schedule a time for your conversation.

We will process all requests as they come in, however we will need to wait on a response from the peer we want to connect you with before we can come back to you, so allow for that in your planning.

 


If you feel like your mental health is in crisis or are worried about the mental health of someone you know, please visit the Mental Health Foundation website for a list of some of the services available in New Zealand that offer support, information and help. All services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week unless otherwise specified.

National helplines

Need to talk? Free call or text 1737 any time for support from a trained counsellor

Lifeline – 0800 543 354 (0800 LIFELINE) or free text 4357 (HELP)

Suicide Crisis Helpline – 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)

Healthline – 0800 611 116

Samaritans – 0800 726 666

Reading a script is easy. Assessing a script and giving useable feedback is a skill.
Most scripts are in development for years, evolving through many drafts. A great script assessment delves into the heart of the what the draft needs and useful notes will excite the writer about the next evolution of the story.

This Talk will discuss what to consider with character, structure, story, dialogue, tone and dramatic premise and how best to communicate that to the writer.
If you are part of a development team join us to hear about the fundamentals of assessing and writing notes that will improve the next draft of your project. Christina MilliganBrendan Donovan and Dianne Taylor are script assessors and script writers with a wealth of hands on experience and expertise to share.

5:45 for 6pm start, Thursday 15 February
The Basement, Lower Greys Ave, Auckland
Koha $5 for those who can afford it

Stay afterwards for pizza

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